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Meskers, A.J.H. (author), Houben, M.M.J. (author), Pennings, H.J.M. (author), Clément, G. (author), Groen, E.L. (author)
BACKGROUND: During large angles of self-tilt in the roll plane on Earth, measurements of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) in the dark show a bias towards the longitudinal body axis, reflecting a systematic underestimation of self-tilt. OBJECTIVE: This study tested the hypothesis that self-tilt is underestimated in partial gravity conditions,...
article 2021
document
Winters, S.M. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Klis, S.F.L. (author)
BACKGROUND: To test for otolith asymmetries, several studies described horizontal translation of the body and head en bloc during fast vertical axis rotation. This stimulus causes one otolithic organ to rotate on-axis, and the other to experience centripetal acceleration. OBJECTIVE: To test a new, more simple method of unilateral stimulation...
article 2014
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Correia Grácio, B.J. (author), de Winkel, K.N. (author), Groen, E.L. (author), Wentink, M. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the...
article 2013
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de Winkel, K.N. (author), Clément, G. (author), Groen, E.L. (author), Werkhoven, P.J. (author)
Although the mechanisms of neural adaptation to weightlessness and re-adaptation to Earth-gravity have received a lot of attention since the first human space flight, there is as yet little knowledge about how spatial orientation is affected by partial gravity, such as lunar gravity of 0.16. g or Martian gravity of 0.38. g. Up to now twelve...
article 2012
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Correia Grácio, B.J. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
Humans are able to estimate the vertical direction of an Earth fixed reference frame, which estimate is known as the subjective vertical (SV). To identify the SV, a distinction must be made between accelerations due to self-motion and gravity. Previous studies on this topic measured the SV using a variety of methods possibly affecting the...
article 2012
document
Khalid, H. (author), Turan, O. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
Subjective vertical (SV) conflict theory postulates that motion sickness is elicited in all situations that lead to a difference between the sensed and subjective verticals. The sensed vertical is Earth's gravity as perceived by human sense modalities; the subjective vertical is also Earth's gravity, but in accordance with the expectations of...
article 2011
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Khalid, H. (author), Turan, O. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Incecik, A. (author)
Subjective-vertical conflict theory (Bles et al., 1998) postulates that all motion sickness provoking situations are characterized by a condition in which the vertical (gravity) sensed by the visual, vestibular and non-vestibular proprioceptors are at variance with the subjective (expected) vertical. SV-conflict models have successfully been...
article 2011
document
Nooij, S.A.E. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author)
It has been found that sustained centrifugation on Earth may evoke sickness symptoms that are similar to those of the Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS). As in SAS, incidence of this ‘Sickness Induced by Centrifugation’ (SIC) is about 50% and the symptoms are particularly evoked by head movements. By systematically varying the G-load and duration...
article 2007
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TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
This paper reviews a framework explaining motion sickness in general and cybersickness in particular. It takes the control of body motion as a starting point. An essential problem concerns the ambiguity between gravity and inertia. Although visual information can be used to make the distinction between these two phenomena, the visual system is...
conference paper 2007
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de Graaf, B. (author), Bles, W. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), TNO Technische Menskunde (author)
In an experiment with seventeen subjects interactions of visual roll motion stimuli and vestibular body tilt stimuli were examined in determining the subjective vertical. Interindi-vidual differences in weighting the visual information were observed, but in general visual and vestibular responses added in setting the vertical. Despite the...
article 1998
document
Bles, W. (author), TNO Technische Menskunde (author)
Coriolis effects are notorious in relation to disorientation and motion sickness in aircrew. A review is provided of experimental data on these Coriolis effects, including the modulatory effects of adding visual or somatosensory rotatory motion information. A vector analysis of the consequences of head movements during somatosensory, visual and...
article 1998
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