Searched for: subject:"motion%5C+sickness"
(1 - 20 of 69)

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Diels, C. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
Motion sickness has gained renewed interested in the context of the developments in vehicle automation in which we are witnessing a transition from a driver-centric to passenger-centric design philosophy. As a corollary, motion sickness can be expected to become considerably more prevalent which creates a hurdle towards the successful...
bookPart 2021
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Schmidt, E.A. (author), Kuiper, O.X. (author), Wolter, S. (author), Diels, C. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
About two in three people have experienced carsickness at some point in their life (Reason & Brand, 1975). Little is known about current numbers of sufferers, cultural differences, or which modulating factors are being perceived as most relevant. Therefore, given a global increase of interest in carsickness driven by the development of automated...
article 2020
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Schmidt, E.A. (author), Kuiper, O.X. (author), Wolter, S. (author), Diels, C. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
About two in three people have experienced carsickness at some point in their life (Reason & Brand, 1975). Little is known about current numbers of sufferers, cultural differences, or which modulating factors are being perceived as most relevant. Therefore, given a global increase of interest in carsickness driven by the development of automated...
article 2020
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Kuiper, O.X. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Diels, C. (author), Schmidt, E.A. (author)
Being able to anticipate upcoming motion is known to potentially mitigate sickness resulting from provocative motion. We investigated whether auditory cues could increase anticipation and subsequently reduce motion sickness. Participants (N = 20) were exposed on a sled on a rail track to two 15-min conditions. Both were identical in terms of...
article 2020
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Bos, J.E. (author), Kuiper, O.X. (author), Schmidt. E.A., (author)
Although the effect of motion predictability on motion sickness seems common knowledge, relevant literature is scarce. We therefore performed two experiments. In Experiment A, 17 subjects were exposed to 15 minutes of repeated forward/backward motions on a linear sled, repeated within subjects in three ways: 1) using identical motions...
conference paper 2020
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Kuiper, O.X. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Diels, C. (author), Cammaerts, K. (author)
We investigated whether motion sickness analogous to carsickness can be studied in a moving base simulator, despite the limited motion envelope. Importantly, to avoid simulator sickness, vision outside the simulator cabin was restricted. Participants (N = 16) were exposed blindfolded to 15-min lateral sinusoidal motion at 0.2 Hz and 0.35 Hz on...
article 2019
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Kuiper, O.X. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Diels, C. (author)
Vection, i.e. a visually induced illusory sense of self-motion, is assumed to play an essential role in visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, its precise role is unknown. Following the sensory conflict theory, a constant state of vection is not expected to lead to a visual-vestibular conflict whereas variability in vection, i.e....
article 2019
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Kuiper, O.X. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Diels, C. (author)
Carsickness is associated with a mismatch between actual and anticipated sensory signals. Occupants of automated vehicles, especially when using a display, are at higher risk of becoming carsick than drivers of conventional vehicles. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of positioning of in-vehicle displays, and subsequent available...
article 2018
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D'Amour, S. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Keshavarz, B. (author)
Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known sensation in virtual environments and simulators, typically characterized by a variety of symptoms such as pallor, sweating, dizziness, fatigue, and/or nausea. Numerous methods to reduce VIMS have been previously introduced; however, a reliable countermeasure is still missing. In the...
article 2017
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Diels, C. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged...
article 2016
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Lubeck, A.J.A. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Stins, J.F. (author)
Effects of visual roll-motion on postural sway and the subjective visual vertical (SVV) often is studied using mechanical devices, whereas electronic displays offer cheaper and more flexible alternatives. These devices typically emit and reflect light scattered by the edges of the screen, providing Earth-fixed cues of verticality. These cues may...
article 2016
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Lubeck, A.J.A. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Stins, J.F. (author)
Objective : Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) and increased postural sway are two adverse side effects that may occur when viewing motion stimuli. However, whether these effects are elevated to a greater extent when viewing stereoscopic 3D motion stimuli, compared to 2D stimuli on a TV screen, has not been investigated under controlled...
article 2016
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Ledegang, W.D. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Houben, M.M.J. (author), Groen, E.L. (author)
This article reports on an exploratory study in a fixed-based simulator to investigate the possible advantage (more presence) and disadvantage (more simulator sickness) of enhancing the visual realism in terms of head-slaved motion parallax. The study was performed in a flight simulator. Since most tasks involved taxiing over a virtual airfield,...
conference paper 2015
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Lubeck, A.J.A. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Stins, J.F. (author)
Abstract Objective It is generally assumed that motion in motion images is responsible for increased postural sway as well as for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, this has not yet been tested. To that end, we studied postural sway and VIMS induced by motion and still images. Method 15 Participants were exposed to motion- and...
article 2015
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Bos, J.E. (author)
BACKGROUND: Motion sickness may reduce passenger comfort and crew performance. Countermeasures are dominated by medication with specific and often undesirable side effects. OBJECTIVE: To shown that sickness due to motion can be reduced by adding an inherent non-sickening vibration and by mental distraction. METHODS: Eighteen blindfolded subjects...
article 2015
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Diels, C. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
Self-driving cars have the potential to bring significant benefits to drivers and society at large. However, all envisaged scenarios are predicted to increase the risk of motion sickness. This will negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and hence negate the benefits of this technology. Here we discuss the impact of the user interface...
conference paper 2015
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Bos, J.E. (author), Ledegang, W.D. (author), Lubeck, A.J.A. (author), Stins, J.F. (author)
Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min after watching a 1 h 3D aviation documentary in a...
article 2013
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Bos, J.E. (author), Houben, M.M.J. (author), Lindenberg, J. (author)
Human performance has been shown to be negatively correlated with seasickness. By reducing crew, ship size, and hence redundancy, sickness induced risks increase exponentially. Although medication is effective, it also causes drowsiness. Non-pharmacological countermeasures are scarce, the most popular one being to look at the horizon. We...
conference paper 2012
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Houben, M.M.J. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Groen, E.L. (author)
Motion sickness can occur in any motion environment to which a person is not adapted, varying from cars, boats, and planes to fun rides and virtual reality. With symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, headache, lethargy, dizziness, and loss of concentration it causes discomfort for passengers but also a decrease in task performance for crew....
report 2012
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Khalid, H. (author), Turan, O. (author), Bos, J.E. (author)
Subjective vertical (SV) conflict theory postulates that motion sickness is elicited in all situations that lead to a difference between the sensed and subjective verticals. The sensed vertical is Earth's gravity as perceived by human sense modalities; the subjective vertical is also Earth's gravity, but in accordance with the expectations of...
article 2011
Searched for: subject:"motion%5C+sickness"
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