Searched for: subject%3A%22Vection%22
(1 - 7 of 7)
document
Kuiper, O.X. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Diels, C. (author)
Vection, i.e. a visually induced illusory sense of self-motion, is assumed to play an essential role in visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, its precise role is unknown. Following the sensory conflict theory, a constant state of vection is not expected to lead to a visual-vestibular conflict whereas variability in vection, i.e....
article 2019
document
Tinga, A.M. (author), Jansen, C. (author), van der Smagt, M.J. (author), Nijboer, T.C.W. (author), van Erp, J.B.F. (author)
In general, moving sensory stimuli (visual and auditory) can induce illusory sensations of self-motion (i.e. vection) in the direction opposite of the sensory stimulation. The aim of the current study was to examine whether tactile stimulation encircling the waist could induce circular vection (around the body's yaw axis) and to examine whether...
article 2018
document
D'Amour, S. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Keshavarz, B. (author)
Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known sensation in virtual environments and simulators, typically characterized by a variety of symptoms such as pallor, sweating, dizziness, fatigue, and/or nausea. Numerous methods to reduce VIMS have been previously introduced; however, a reliable countermeasure is still missing. In the...
article 2017
document
Lubeck, A.J.A. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Stins, J.F. (author)
Abstract Objective It is generally assumed that motion in motion images is responsible for increased postural sway as well as for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, this has not yet been tested. To that end, we studied postural sway and VIMS induced by motion and still images. Method 15 Participants were exposed to motion- and...
article 2015
document
Mert, A. (author), Hak, L. (author), Bles, W. (author)
Introduction: Balance is negatively influenced by optokinetic stimuli. Fall research with these stimuli has been done with standing subjects. Less is known of the influence these stimuli have on risk of falling while walking. The objective of this study was to qualitatively investigate the influence of optokinetic roll stimuli on balance during...
conference paper 2011
document
Bos, J.E. (author), Bles, W. (author), TNO Technische Menskunde (author)
Motion sickness is not only elicited by certain kinds of self-motion, but also by motion of a visual scene. In case of the latter, optokinetic drums are often used and a visual-vestibular conflict is assumed to cause the sickness. When the rotation axis is Earth vertical however, different studies show different results. Here, we propose that...
article 2004
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Bles, W. (author), Jelmorini, M. (author), Bekkering, H. (author), de Graaf, B. (author), TNO Technische Menskunde (author)
A sensation of linear self-motion can be induced in a blindfolded stationary sitting subject, who keeps contact with a linearly moving platform (acceleration 0.1 m/s²) in the frontoparallel plane by means of a hand-over-hand walking action. When discordant suprathreshold vestibular information from the otoliths is added by moving the subject...
article 1995
Searched for: subject%3A%22Vection%22
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