Searched for: subject:"Spatial%5C+disorientation"
(1 - 9 of 9)
document
van den Hoed, A. (author), Landman, A. (author), van Baelen, D. (author), van Paassen, R. (author), Groen, E.L. (author), Mulder, M. (author)
Objective: We tested whether a procedure in a hexapod simulator can cause incorrect assumptions of the bank angle (i.e., the “leans”) in airline pilots as well as incorrect interpretations of the attitude indicator (AI). Background: The effect of the leans on interpretation errors has previously been demonstrated in nonpilots. In-flight,...
article 2020
document
Landman, A. (author), Davies, S. (author), Groen, E.L. (author), van Paassen, M.M.R. (author), Lawson, N.J. (author), Bronkhorst, A.W. (author), Mulder, M. (author)
We hypothesized that an incorrect expectation due to spatial disorientation may induce roll reversal errors. To test this, an in-flight experiment was performed, in which forty non-pilots rolled wings level after receiving motion cues. A No-leans condition (subthreshold motion to a bank angle) was included, as well as a Leans-opposite condition ...
article 2019
document
Nooij, S.A.E. (author), Groen, E.L. (author)
Introduction: Spatial disorientation (SD) is still a contributing factor in many aviation accidents, stressing the need for adequate SD training scenarios. In this article we focused on the post-roll effect (the sensation of rolling back after a roll maneuver, such as an entry of a coordinated turn) and investigated the effect of roll stimuli on...
article 2011
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Bles, W. (author), Groen, E. (author), TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author)
The research facility DESDEMONA features a unique motion platform, combining a fully gimbaled cabin with the capability of producing sustained g-loads. Originally designed for ground-based simulation as well as training of spatial disorientation in aviation, the motion capabilities are also interesting for other areas. In this paper we will...
article 2009
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Groen, E.L. (author), Nooij, S.A.E. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author)
At TNO research is ongoing on neuro-vestibular adaptation to altered G-levels. It is well-known that during the first days in weightlessness 50-80% of all astronauts suffer from the Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS), which involves space motion sickness, spatial disorientation and motion illusions. After return on Earth the problems re-appear, but...
conference paper 2008
document
Groen, E.L. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author)
In this study we describe a new approach to relate simulator sickness ratings with the main frequency component of the simulator motion mismatch, that is, the computed difference between the time histories of simulator motion and vehicle motion, respectively. During two driving simulator experiments in the TNO movingbase driving simulator—that...
article 2008
document
Nooij, S.A.E. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Groen, E.L. (author), TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author)
Adaptation to a novel gravitational state involves adaptation of vestibular mediated responses, in particular those mediated by the otolith organs. The present paper investigates whether the orientation of Listing’s plane, which is under control of otolith signals, is affected by sustained exposure to hypergravity. Subjects were exposed to four...
article 2008
document
Nooij, S.A.E. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Groen, E.L. (author), TNO Defensie en Veiligheid (author)
Prolonged exposure to hypergravity in a human centrifuge can lead to post-rotary spatial disorientation and motion sickness. These symptoms are mainly provoked by tilting head movements and resemble the Space Adaptation Syndrome. We hypothesized that the occurrence of these post-rotary effects might be related to changes in the velocity storage ...
article 2008
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Golding, J.F. (author), Bles, W. (author), Bos, J.E. (author), Haynes, T. (author), Gresty, M.A. (author), TNO Technische Menskunde (author)
Maneuvering in vehicles exposes occupants to low frequency forces (<1 Hz) which can provoke motion sickness. Hypothesis: Aligning with the tilting inertial resultant (gravity + imposed horizontal acceleration: gravito-inertial force (GIF)) may reduce motion sickness when tilting is either 'active' (self-initiated; Experiment 1) or 'passive' ...
article 2003
Searched for: subject:"Spatial%5C+disorientation"
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