Searched for: subject:"Partial%5C+factors"
(1 - 9 of 9)
document
den Otter, C. (author), Maljaars, J. (author)
Bolted connections are applied in many aluminium structures. Stainless steel bolts are often preferred over carbon steel bolts in aluminium connections to prevent galvanic corrosion. However, current design standards and guidelines do not allow for using preloaded stainless steel bolts in slip resistant connections, mainly because of a lack of...
article 2020
document
Nadolski, V. (author), Rózsás, Á. (author), Sýkora, M. (author)
Partial factors are commonly based on expert judgements and on calibration to previous design formats. This inevitably results in unbalanced structural reliability for different types of construction materials, loads and limit states. Probabilistic calibration makes it possible to account for plentiful requirements on structural performance,...
article 2019
document
Meinen, N.E. (author), Steenbergen, R.D.J.M. (author)
To assess the reliability of a structure, reliability based codes such as EN1990:2002 allow for the application of full-probabilistic methods and semi-probabilistic methods (i.e. the partial factor method). In principle, both methods should be equivalent and lead to (approximately) the same reliability level. In this study, this equivalence is...
article 2018
document
Hashemi, B. (author), Maljaars, J. (author), Leonetti, D. (author), Snijder, H.H. (author)
Reliability analysis is a crucial phase in assessing the safety status of new and existing structures. One of its applications is to predict the fatigue life of fatigue prone details. Two models are used to formulate the fatigue limit state: S-N curves in combination with Palmgren-Miner damage accumulation rule and linear elastic fracture...
article 2017
document
Caspeele, R. (author), Sykora, M. (author), Allaix, D.L. (author), Steenbergen, R.D.J.M. (author)
In contrast to the design of new structures, the assessment of existing structures often relies on the subjective judgement of the investigating engineer. An objective verification format for existing structures based on alternative partial factors is however feasible, enabling a rather simple and straightforward, but objective and coherent...
article 2013
document
Caspeele, R.C.E. (author), Steenbergen, R.D.J.M. (author), Taerwe, L.R. (author)
The Eurocodes currently do not provide a coherent, straightforward framework for the semi-probabilistic design of temporary structures. Besides the need for suitable target reliability levels, a coherent definition of partial factors is needed in order to adjust them according to the chosen target reliability level and the intended reference...
article 2013
document
Steenbergen, R.D.J.M. (author), de Boer, A. (author), van der Veen, C. (author)
Evaluating and upgrading concrete slab bridges is an important issue. A large part of the existing infrastructure has been built about 50 years ago and the design life has been reached or will be reached in the near future. Also traffic loads have increased significantly over the last 50 years. These structures need to be reassessed in order to...
conference paper 2011
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Steenbergen, R.D.J.M. (author), Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M. (author), TNO Bouw en Ondergrond (author)
Evaluating and upgrading existing structures becomes more and more important. For a large part of the existing infrastructure and buildings the design life has been reached or will be reached in the near future. These structures need to be reassessed in order to find out whether the safety requirements are met. Not only for new structures but...
article 2010
document
Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M. (author)
Partial Factor Design is nowadays a generally accepted design method for building and civil engineering structures. For most engineers the general philosophy that the safety factors depend on the type of the load and on the limit state under consideration makes sense. However, the background, in particular the reliability aspect, seems to be...
conference paper 2001
Searched for: subject:"Partial%5C+factors"
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