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Goudswaard, A. (author), Dhondt, S. (author), Vergeer, R. (author), Oeij, P. (author), de Leede, J. (author), van C Adrichem, K. (author), Csizmadia, P. (author), Makó, C. (author), Illésy, M. (author), Tóth, A. (author)
Companies in search of improved productivity use a wide range of approaches, from financial incentives and skills upgrading and training to increased autonomy of individuals and teams. Working time flexibility has the added advantage in that it can benefit both workers and employers: it gives workers more control over their work–life balance and...
book 2012
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Houtman, I. (author)
In the Netherlands there are no recent data on alcohol consumption or drug use at work. As far as there are data, they are quite old (2003) and from one single study. The data that is more recently collected reflect habitual alcohol consumption and drug use. Recent data suggest that alcohol consumption and drug use are relatively low in people...
report 2012
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Hooftman, W. (author), Houtman, I. (author)
The quality of work in the Netherlands remains quite stable, with a small increase in exposure to time pressure. Despite the stable working conditions, fewer workers feel that protective measures are needed. Changes in work disability regulations have led to far fewer workers dropping out of employment due to disability. However, it appears that...
report 2012
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Dhondt, S. (author)
The financial and economic crisis has affected the wage development in The Netherlands. Wage growth has slowed down, but not completely disappeared; mainly the wage drift has disappeared. Sometimes trade unions were capable of exchanging working time reduction for less wage growth. But in general, the wage ‘crunch’ was not followed with more...
report 2012
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Hooftman, W. (author), Houtman, I.L.D. (author)
The quality of work in the Netherlands remains quite stable, with a small increase in exposure to time pressure. Despite the stable working conditions, fewer workers feel that protective measures are needed. Changes in work disability regulations have led to far fewer workers dropping out of employment due to disability. However, it appears that...
report 2012
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Hooftman, W. (author), Houtman, I. (author), Kwantes, J.H. (author)
Based on the Netherlands Working Condition Survey (NWCS), this report exaines working conditions in the retail sector in the Netherlands. It concludes that the retail sector is a sector in which many young employees work. These employees often work part-time and have a temporary contract. The retail sector does worse on the traditional ergonomic...
report 2012
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Venema, A. (author), van der Klauw, M. (author)
In 2011, 24% of Dutch employees experienced violence from people outside their working environment while at work while 16% experienced violence from colleagues. Although these figures are stable, they have a definite impact on workers’ health and job satisfaction, creating an increased perception of the risk of violence. A new study also shows...
report 2012
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Bakhuys Roozeboom, M.M.C. (author), Wiezer, N.M. (author), Schelvis, R. (author), de Kraker, H. (author)
The need for evidence-based solutions to the problem of work-related stress among employees in the Netherlands is increasing. Research institute TNO suggested that managers might learn about the issue by playing a specially designed game based around work-related stress. This led to the development of The Engagement game which, it is hoped,...
report 2012
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Kraan, K. (author), Wevers, C. (author)
Keeping people in employment until retirement age is becoming increasingly important in the Netherlands, as it is in the rest of Europe. A model has been developed for ‘sustainable employability’, and a first measurement created using the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2010 and Netherlands Employer Working Survey 2010. Sustainable...
report 2012
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Koppes, L. (author)
Researchers in the Netherlands have been examining to what extent workers are modifying their hours to cope with high levels of work-related emotional exhaustion. Findings reveal that most full-time employees would prefer a cut in their hours, with those reporting emotional exhaustion wanting a larger reduction in their working week. By contrast...
report 2012
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van Zwieten, M. (author)
Data from the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey 2010 indicate that a quarter of Dutch employees worked overtime as part of their normal working week, about a quarter regularly worked evenings and nights, and about 30% regularly worked at weekends. The data also show that 13% of Dutch employees regularly worked shifts in 2010. Working...
report 2012
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Kraan, K. (author), Dhondt, S. (author), de Jong, T. (author)
A recent TNO study found that using social media at work encourages innovative, active work behaviour among Dutch employees but does not increase emotional exhaustion due to information overload. Researchers discovered that social media use favoured innovative work most if its use was not in the context of company-wide information and...
report 2011
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Houtman, I. (author), Geuskens, G. (author)
According to a recent study based on the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey, Dutch employees are increasingly motivated to work until the official retirement age of 65 (42% in 2009). They also increasingly think they will be able to do so in their present job (45%). A poor social climate at work and poor health are predictors of lower...
report 2011
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Klein Hesselink, J. (author)
Absenteeism in the Netherlands rose steadily in the 1960s and 70s, driven by legislation that made it attractive for employees to take long-term sick leave. Changes in laws on absenteeism and disability seem to have been a driving force behind the fall in rates since the early 1980s and employers have become more active in encouraging workers to...
report 2011
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Grünell, M. (author), Houtman, I. (author)
report 2011
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Kraan, K. (author), Vaas, F. (author)
report 2011
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Klein Hesselink, J. (author), Houtman, I. (author)
report 2011
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de Jong, T. (author)
Available data from the Netherlands show no clear evidence that workers are participating more or less in internal or external training provided or supported by the enterprise during the economic crisis period than before. An exception is the group of young workers who participated significantly less in external education in 2008-2009 than...
report 2011
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Klein Hesselink, D.J. (author)
In The Netherlands nationals with a foreign background are discriminated on the labour marked. The situation improved somewhat before the crisis in 2008, but during this crisis particularly young immigrants suffered much discrimination. There is a difference between nationals with a western and non-western foreign background. Nationals with a...
report 2011
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Klein Hesselink, J. (author)
The use of temporary employment contracts is a well-used labour market strategy in the Netherlands. Employers use them to explore the suitability of employees and temporary employees are often entrants to the labour market. In some sectors, organisations prefer to hire independent contractors who are generally highly motivated. Numbers of...
report 2010
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